UTC
The Drunkard; or, the Fallen Saved
Adapted by W.H. Smith
New York: WM. Taylor and Co.1850

SCENE IV.—Room in Rencelaw's house; very handsome table, chairs, handsome books, &c.

EDWARD MIDDLETON, C., discovered reading—dressed, and looking well, &c.


Edward.

  [Side of table.] What gratitude do I not owe this generous, noble-hearted man, who, from the depths of wretchedness and horror, has restored me to the world, to myself, and to religion. Oh! what joy can equal the bright sensations of a thinking being, when redeemed from that degrading vice; his prisoned heart beats with rapture; his swelling veins bound with vigor; and with tremulous gratitude, he calls on the Supreme Being for blessings on his benefactor.


Mary.

  [Outside, R.] Where is my dear—my loved—redeemed one.


57

MARY enters with JULIA, R.

Edward! my dear, dear husband. [They embrace.


Edward.

  Mary, my blessed one! My child, my darling! Bounteous heaven! accept my thanks.


Julia.

  Father, dear father—you look as you did the bright sunshiny morning, I first went to school. Your voice sounds as it used when I sang the evening hymn, and you kissed and blessed me. You cry, father. Do not cry; but your tears are not such tears as mother shed, when she had no bread to give me.


Edward.

  [Kisses her.] No, my blessed child, they are not; they are tears of repentence, Julia, but of joy.


Mary.

  Oh! my beloved, my redeemed one, all my poor sufferings are as nothing weighed in a balance with my present joy.

Enter RENCELAW, R.

Respected sir, what words can express our gratification?


Rencelaw.

  Pay it where 'tis justly due, to heaven! I am but the humble instrument, and in your sweet content, I am rewarded.


Julia.

  [Going to Rencelaw, R.] I shall not forget what mother last night taught me.


Rencelaw.

  What was that, sweet girl.


Julia.

  In my prayers, when I have asked for a blessing for my father and mother, I pray to Him to bless Arden Rencelaw too.


Rencelaw.

  Dear child. [Kisses her.


Edward.

  I will not wrong your generous nature, by fulsome outward gratitude, for your most noble conduct, but humbly hope, that He will give me strength to continue in the glorious path, adorned by your bright example, in the words of New England's favored poet:

"There came a change, the cloud rolled off
A light fell on my brain,
And like the passing of a dream,
That cometh not again.
The darkness of my spirit fled,
I saw the gulf before;
And shuddered at the waste behind,
And am a man once more."

END OF ACT IV.