UTC
The New York Times
Unsigned
10 February 1893

IN AID OF COOK'S OPERA SCHEME

CONCERT BY COLORED PERSONS TO BE GIVEN NEXT MONDAY

   Prominent society people are taking a great interest in the project for the production at the World's Fair of Will M. Cook's opera, founded on "Uncle Tom's Cabin."

   In accordance with a suggestion made by Mr. Fred Douglass, it was decided to have a concert in this city for the purpose of testing the attitude of New York toward the project. The concert will take place Monday evening at the Carnegie Music Hall, and there is every reason to believe that it will be a highly successful affair, both artistically and from a financial standpoint. The proceeds will be devoted to buying costumes and training the chorus for the production of the opera.

   Boxes for the concert have been taken by Mrs. Cleveland, Mrs. C. P. Andrews, Mrs. Steinway, Chauncey M. Depew, Col. Robert G. Ingersoll, Mrs. Hicks-Lord, Mrs. Thurber, Mrs. Henry Villard, and Collis P. Huntington. Mr. Douglass will come on from Washington and will make a short address.

   Among the colored artists who will take part in the concert are Miss Sissieretta Jones, (the Black Patti,) the Fiske University Jubilee Singers, Harry Burleigh, baritone, and Paul Bolen, pianist, both pupils of the National Conservatory of Music; Lloyd Biggs of Baltimore, a tenor who is one of the best-known colored composers in the United States; the Phonetic Quartet of Baltimore, Miss Lulu Hamer, contralto, and Will M. Cook, violinist.

   The programme is arranged with the idea of showing the progress in music made by the colored race, and for that reason first there will be rendered the wild plantation melodies, which will be given with the abandon of antebellum days on the real plantations. The closing number will be Gounod's "Ave Maria."

   Through the efforts of Mrs. Henry Ward Beecher the concert will be repeated in Brooklyn March 3.