UTC
Frederick Douglass' Paper
Susan F. Porter and others
Rochester: 10 September 1852

SECOND ANTI-SLAVERY FESTIVAL

Of the "Ladies' Anti-Slavery Sewing Society," to be held in Corinthian Hall, Rochester, the third week in December, 1852.

  The ladies of the "Rochester Anti-Slavery Sewing Society," in announcing their purpose to hold their second anti-slavery festival, would express their undiminished interest in the cause of the slave, and their unshaken confidence in the faithful promulgation of truth, as a means of bringing the country to a sense of the duty of emancipation.

  Instead of feeling depressed and disheartened by the almost universal effort to silence the anti-slavery agitation, we see, in this fact, incontestible evidence of the soundness of the philosophy of our movement, and of the fitness of our measures to accomplish the great and desirable end at which we aim.

  One sign of the times, full of encouragement, we would especially and gratefully mention. It is this: never, since the subject of slavery was first brought before the American people, were so many and so able anti-slavery publications issued from the press in one year, as in the present; and never were such publications so universally read as now. "UNCLE TOM'S CABIN," by Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe, has come down, upon the dark abodes of human bondage, like the morning sunlight, unfolding to view the enormities of slavery, in a manner which has fastened all eyes upon them, and awakened sympathy for the slave in hearts unused to feel. Sundry other able works on the subject have followed, in rapid succession; and the cry is still, they come! while "day by day, and hour by hour, throughout the civilized world," sympathy is diminishing for the oppressor, and increasing for his victims.

  Greatly encouraged, however, as we are by the present aspect of the anti-slavery cause, we recognize the truth that "the price of Liberty is unceasing vigilance," and also the duty of persevering in those exertions which have, already, been owned and blest of Him whose ear is ever open to the cries of the poor and the needy. The slave is still in his chains, and can hardly spare one hand or one instrumentality from the great work of his emancipation.

  Ere we close our appeal, we beg to apprize our friends that we intend to publish an anti-slavery annual, in which we wish to record the testimony of as many distinguished persons as we can, against the great sin of our age and nation—American Slavery. It was first designed to name the book, "The Anti-Slavery Autograph;" but the gifted authoress of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" has christened it "Autographs for Freedom;" and we willingly accept her baptism for the forthcoming volume.

  We are greatly encouraged by the fact that a number of favorable responses, in regard to "The Autograph," have already been received from philanthropic friends on both sides the Atlantic, who extend to us a warm and hearty co-operation.

  We now summon again our sisters and friends, American and British, to come to the aid of this, our second anti-slavery festival.

  We can all do something to forward this object. Money is always needed, and donations of that kind will be acceptable. Materials for [manufacture], and articles of needle-work, may be sent to the house of the Treasurer, Miss Porter, 10 North Sophia St., or to the Secretary, North Star Office, Rochester.

  

SUSAN F. PORTER, SARAH T. GOULD,
MARIA G PORTER, ELIZABETH BUELL,
MARIA WEDDLE, EMILY LANG,
ADELINA M. DAWLEY, FRANCES S. AVERY,
ISABELLA J. PORTER, MARY A. B. SCOTT,
CHARLOTTE WILBER, MARY J. PORTER,
CAROLINE WRIGHT, REBECCA BISHOP,
CORNELIA RAYMOND, ANN SERPELL,
LAURA FARLEY, —- MATHER,
D. A. WILBER, SARAH M. KIRBY,
MARGARET TOWER, ELIZABETH ADAMS,
ALMIRA PORTER, JANE GIFFORD,
P. H. PICKARD, JULIA GRIFFITHS,
EMILY W. FOGG.