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The Christian Slave
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Boston: Phillips, Sampson, 1855

SCENE V.—The Lawn before the house.

Enter SAM and ANDY with the horses.

Andy.

  Here dey is! [Fastens them to a post.]


Sam.

  Here, now, Andy—see dis? [Holding up a beech-nut.]


Andy.

  Laws! what?


Sam.

  Look here! [Slips it under the saddle.] Soh!


Andy.

  Why Sam!


Sam.

  An't I a hoss!—ku! ku!— [Strokes the horse.]—Skeery are ye? I'll fix ye—Ku! [Poking Andy in the side.] Now, Andy, chile, I's gwine to be 'structin' ye in yer duties. Ye see, by'm-bye, when dat ar grand gentleman comes to be gettin' up, I would n't be't all surprised if this yer critter should gib a fling. Ye know, Andy, critters will do sich things. Ku! ku!


Andy.

  High ah!


Sam.

  Yes, you see, Andy, missis wants to make time,—dat ar's clar to der most or'nary 'bserver. I jis make a little for her. Now,


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ye see, get all dese yer hosses loose, caperin' permiscus round dis yer lot and down to de wood dar, and I spec mas'r won't be off in a hurry.


Andy.

  Ku! ku! ku!


Sam.

  Yer see, Andy, if any such thing should happen as that Mas'r Haley's horse should begin to act contrary, and cut up, you and I jist let's go of our 'n to help him; and we'll help him—O yes!

Enter HALEY, booted and spurred, with large riding-whip.

Haley.

  Well, boys, look alive now; we must lose no time.


Sam.

  Not a bit of him, mas'r.

[HALEY mounts, and is instantly thrown. The horses run away. SAM and ANDY chasing, waving their hats and shouting, followed by all the negro children. HALEY retires to the parlor.]