UTC
The Christian Slave
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Boston: Phillips, Sampson, 1855

-- SCENE VI.—The Stable-yard.

Enter SAM and ANDY, leading the horses, covered with foam.

Sam. [Panting.]

  Did yer see him, Andy?—did yer see him? O, Lor, if it war n't as good as a meetin', now, to see him a dancin' and kickin' and swarin' at us. Did n't I hear him? Swar away, ole fellow, ses I; will yer have yer hoss now, or wait till you cotch him? ses I. Lor, Andy, I think I can see him now.


Sam and Andy.

  Ha ha ha! he he he! hi hi hi! ho ho ho!


Sam.

  Yer oughter seen how mad he looked, when I brought the hoss up. Lor, he'd a killed me, if he durs' to; and there I was a standin' as innercent and as humble.


Andy.

  Lor, I seed you; an't you an old hoss, Sam?


Sam.

  Rather 'spects I am. Did yer see missis upstars at the winder? I seed her laughin'.


Andy.

  I'm sure, I was racin' so, I did n't see nothing.


Sam.

  Well, yer see, I's 'quired what yer may call a habit o' bobservation, Andy. It's a very 'portant habit, Andy, and I 'commend yer to be cultivatin' it, now yer young. Hist up that hind foot, Andy. Yer see, Andy, it's bobservation makes all de difference in niggers. Did n't I see which way the wind blew dis yer mornin'? Didn't I see what Missis wanted, though she never let on? Dat ar's bobservation, Andy. I 'spects it's what you may call a faculty. Faculties is different in different peoples, but cultivation of 'em goes a great way.


Andy.

  I guess if I had n't helped yer bobservation dis mornin', yer would n't have see yet way so smart.


Sam.

  Andy, you's a promisin' child, der an't no manner o' doubt. I thinks lots of yer, Andy; and I don't feel no ways ashamed to take idees from you. We oughtenter overlook nobody, Andy, 'cause the smartest on us gets tripped up sometimes. And so, Andy, let's go up to the house now. I'll be boun' missis 'll give us an uncommon good bite dis yer time.